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the united states. he's also attacking u.s. troops in afghanistan. >> we've almost called venus the forest gufrp of the jihad in the sense that he seemed to find this way to get himself involved in operations or attacks that seem way beyond a 20-some-odd convert from long island should be involved in. >> an american so radical iezed, so dangerous, he's willing to help al qaeda plot bombings that could kill his own friends and even his own family on long island. >> in a conventional war you have companies, you have divisions, you have brigades, you have battalions. in this war, every single person counts. every sickle person that goes over there like him is somebody we can't miss. >> but the tables could be turning on al qaeda. their one-time secret weapon could be spilling their secrets. family, friends, and intelligence officials are left wondering why and how did bryant turn into a terrorist. who convinced him to wage jihad against his neighbors? my search for answers begins about an hour's drive from new york city where bryant kneel venus was born to the suburbs of long island where his
technology require a new level in the u.s.- israel cooperation. the rockets with better guidance system and greater range are spreading across the region. hamas has a substantial number of rockets in gaza. they all pose a serious danger. these and other threats to israel's civilian population are real and growing. they must be addressed. we are standing shoulder to shoulder with our israeli partners to do so. coming into my current job after eight years with senator clinton, i can attest to hurt deep sense of pride in being a strong voice for israel. i travel to israel with senator clinton in 2005. i join her on her first visit to israel as secretary of state in march of 2009. when it comes to the u.s.-israel relationship, the policy guidance secretary clinton has given me is no different from the guidance she gave me when i worked for her in the senate. in a recent speech, she asked me, coming from this experience of working with her, to make the management of our security relationship with israel preserving israel's military edge among my top priorities. the unique relationship betwee
in the u.s. completing the journey from russia. the plane landed moments ago at dulles international airport in the washington area. their return completes the spy swap with echoes of the cold war that also sent ten russian agents who have been living here in the u.s. back to moscow. for a look at how it all went down today, here is correspondent david lee miller in new york. >> reporter: less than two weeks after they were arrested, ten convicted russian spies are now in moscow. without any fanfare, their plane touched down at one of the city's airports. for most on board, including anna chapman, it was a return home. but for vicky, polalles, likely to be a stop on her way to native peru. all expelled from the u.s. after pleading guilty to a single charge of conspiracy to act as foreign agent. in exchange for their release, russia set free four prisoner, three former kgb about and arms controlled researcher. four russian prisoners with flown to air force base in england where two of the russians were dropped off before the plane headed back to the u.s. a russian analyst said it was
situation room." happening now. iran says he was kidnapped by the united states. the u.s. calls that claim preposterous. what's the real story behind the iranian scientist's now turned up at the pakistani embassy. >>> the legendary owner of the new york yankees, george steinbrenner. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> at some point perhaps in the next hour we could see the beginning of the end of that big dark gush over oil that's been tainting the gulf of mexico for 85 days. we're standing by for testing to begin on the new cap bp placed on its ruptured wellhead. over the course of those tests we should learn if the leak is sealed and the oil is stopped. even if that happens, there should still be plenty of oil left in the gulf to clean up. we've been getting an exclusive look at one of the most high-tech weapons to take care of the spill. ines, tell us what you're been discover. >> reporter: over the past few weeks they've been flying overhead to see where the oil was. they were doing it with technology that wasn't intended for this purpose and we've been able to get ex
for the u.s. the whole exchange happened on an airport tarmac in vienna, austr austria. one plane headed east and the other headed west. matthew chance is in moscow with the latest. >> reporter: that's right. the biggest spy swap since the end of the cold war has taken place on the tarmac of the airports in the austrian capital of view any. the plane carrying the ten confessed spies from the united states, confessed to working for russia. landed at the airport a short time ago. couple of hours ago now. it was followed quickly afterwards by an official aircraft from russia which was carrying four people pardoned by russian serving the lengthy prison sentences in russian jails for spying for western powers, including the united states. the exchange took place on the tarmac which men none of the -- people actually entered the country of austria. the one plane carrying the four from russia has taken off and landed, we understand, now from the united kingdom. the other aircraft carrying the ten russians arraigned in new york is still on its way back to the russian capital. >> this was all par
there and how will that impact the timetable for u.s. troop withdrawal? jon: bottom box, live in new york, just one of the cities where the heat is on big time, the northeast looking at triple digit temps. how long will this heat wave last and how long can you stay safe and cool during this summer sizler? >>> a new leader taking charge of the war in afghanistan. general david petraeus, formally assuming command, telling the 130,000 international troops you said his command, we are in this to win. petraeus, quickly stepping in to replace general stanley mcchrystal who resigned after those controversial remarks he made to rolling stone magazine. petraeus is in charge of turning around an increasingly deadly war at a critical time. he was just months -- he has just months, i should say, to convince both the afghan people and neighboring nations that the u.s. is committed to keeping al-qaeda out of that country. major garrett is live from the white house for us now. we all know june was the deadliest month of the afghan war, major, one of the issues facing u.s. forces, those rules of engagement. wh
. host: the debate over u.s. strategy in afghanistan is back on the front page this morning, following the leak of those wikileak documents -- one legislator says these documents call into question several things, and an investigation is likely to follow. meanwhile, slated to vote on $37 billion in emergency supplemental money for the war. the leak could complement that. we want your thoughts this morning on the leak. here are the lines. we will get to those phone calls in just a minute. on the house but, that $37 billion supplemental amount, senator dennis whose image is circulating a letter asking congressional members to vote against the supplemental funding. "the washington post" this morning says that official leaks will not alter views. they know that republicans have been largely silent. perhaps because the bulk of documents concerned the war effort during the george w. bush administration. lawmakers said the trove of documents may harden opposition, but is unlikely to suddenly alter impressions of a war the administration had previously acknowledged is tough amid declining publ
with the united states. but japanese think that the u.s. presence in the asia- pacific and japan is indispensable. we are grateful to the service of women and men in uniform of this country. although i have to make two preconditions. one is that both the u.s. government and japanese government will continue the effort to lessen the burden of the bases. this is a treaty obligation. we will have a basis, but we have to be always mindful about people -- will have bases, but we have to be always mindful about people surrounding the base. it makes the surrounding people problems, and we have to lessen that. the most important issue here is okinawa, where 75% of the u.s. bases is concentrated. we have to continue to alleviate, lessen the burden, on the okinawan people. there is a marine base. we are now agreeing to move it to north of the island, and also to leave other burdens as well -- impacts as well. remember, prime minister hatoyama said that he will try to come up with a conclusion by may 31. a lot of people said that this was very difficult, but he tried his best and made an agreement at least
general david petraeus assuming command of u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan. he's stepping into a place general stanley mcchrystal, you may recall, resigned following the controversial comments he made to "rolling stone" magazine and the general takes over what may be a critical time for the war. both behind the scenes and, on the front lines. connor powell streaming live from afghanistan with the latest. general david petraeus takes over this morning, any big changes expected immediately? >> well, eric, general petraeus now is about 150,000 u.s. and international troops here as part of the nato isaf effort here in afghanistan and he reiterated today what he said the past few days. there will be no major changes to the strategy and he backs the strategy general stanley mcchrystal put in place and, the general was part of designing the strategy, so, it is not surprising that he is not going to change it but he reiterated today, simply saying the leadership may change from time-to-time here, the strategy will stay the same, but, perhaps the greater challenge in addition to implementing th
york to break down the numbers from the u.s. census bureau. carter? >> reporter: so get this. here is the number of americans who own their homes. it is 66.9% right now. that is the lowest number since 1999. the paeg was 69.2% in 2004. doesn't sound like a big difference percentagewise but that's millions and millions of homes. that was the housing boom in 2004. remember that? money was cheap and easy to get. now everybody is unemployed. they can't pay their bills. homes are getting foreclosed on. and they are flooding the market. nearly 19 million homes were vacant in the second quarter. this counts homes for sale and, if foreclosures. many people are coping by moving in with family or renting. expiration of first time home buyer is hurting. second lowest pace on record. home prices are back where they were in 2003. the bottom line right now is that homeownership is not guaranteed very many it once was. during the housing boom, many people were looking at their home primarily as an investment. not a place that they were going to live for 30 years or more. i think that perspective
ago that six u.s. service members have been killed in attacks today in afghanistan. our atia abawi is with us again from kabul. we heard the number six had been killed but most of these were separate incidents. >> reporter: good morning, t.j. absolutely right. another grim day here in afghanistan. six different incidents in different parts of the country proving that the fighting is widespread in this vast land. two u.s. service members were killed in southern afghanistan in separate ied strikes. that's roadside mines. one was also killed in eastern afghanistan by the same tactic. three others were also killed in eastern afghanistan, small arms fire, insurgent attack, as well as an accidental explosion. today, proof that the summer is intense here in afghanistan. the fighting will continue. this is a month after, just a couple of weeks after the deadliest month here in afghanistan since the war began enter 2001. 101 nato service members killed. that's the deadliest that this war has seen. many do expect that july and august may be worse. t.j.? >> it may be worse. like you mentioned
-old unknown, unemployed military vet to the u.s. senate. >> while there were a free moments that had people thinking, awkward! there were others in the crowd wondering if maybe this wasn't such a bad idea after all. jessica yellin was there for the big debut. >> reporter: if there's one person who believes alvin greene could be south carolina's next u.s. senator, it's alvin greene. >> i'm the best candidate in the united states senate race here in south carolina. i am also the best choice for the image award next year. >> reporter: he does not lack confidence. it is a new campaign speech, greene offered some specifics. >> let's pick up with some of the projects that were put on hold after 9/11. such as improving transportation and infrastructure. >> reporter: some standard rhetoric -- >> my campaign is about getting south carolina and america back to work and moving south carolina and america forward. >> reporter: and a glimpse of his political philosophy. >> the punishment should fit the crime. fairness saves us money. let's reclaim our country from the terrorists and the communists. i kno
before the race. >> not even close. >>> on the broadcast tonight, the slowdown. news tonight about the u.s. economy, jobs, housing, stocks and what many hoped would be a rebound. >>> the spies who lived quiet lives in america were working for russians. tonight, a stunning admission. >>> the struggle in the gulf. stormy weather slows the cleanup but doesn't stop people making a difference for friends and neighbors. >>> and the secret. how do some people make it to 100? how do some people make it to 100? "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> announcer: from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is nbc "nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. i'm ann curry in for brian williams. new signs tonight the economy is slowing down. from a jump in unemployment benefits to a record low number of home sales to slowdowns in manufacturing, construction and auto sales, it's all pointing to an economy that looks less healthy than it did a few weeks ago. and that was reflected in the stock market today. the dow closed down another 41 points standin
show you how they're keeping the power flowing. >>> spies on the move. the u.s. and russia swapping secret agents. >>> jindal on a tear. bobby jindal rips into federal experts. who is right now about what he wants? we double check. >>> and ringo at 70. and we know his secret birthday wish. >>> good evening. it is the fourth day now of 100 degree temperatures, and the heat is taking its toll. we've seen water mains bursting. here's one. and the roads are buckling from the heat. up and down the east coast, big cities bake for another day. and those people who have to direct the power grids are trying something heroic to avoid blackouts. we're going to show you their decisions, as sharyn alfonsi starts us off in a truly steamy new york. >> reporter: diane, surprisingly, there are no widespread outages tonight. but utility companies tell us the worst problems may be ahead. so, cities around the country are taking extreme measures. they struggled to make their way out of a steamy subway station. the escalators shut off to conserve power. extreme measures to cut down on extreme demand for
russian spies on the tarmac in moscow. the u.s. attorney conforms the largest u.s.-russia spy exchange since the cold war is a success. we have a live report. patti ann: in the middle box, sarah palin releases a brand new campaign-style ad. is it a sign she'll run for president in 2012. jon: forget how much is the doingy in the window, a proposed new law in one city that would ban pets, almost all of them. a major u.s. city considering the measure. patti ann: take a look at our newsroom, breaking news coming in from across the country and around the world. jon: president obama is in nevada to talk about green jobs and to help raise money for senate majority leader harry reid. the president, hosting a fund-raiser last night in las vegas, telling the crowd he needs senator reid's help in washington. reid is struggling in his reelection campaign against republican sharron angle a. tea party favorite. anita vogel streaming live from las vegas. will president obama's visit help or hurt harry reid here, anita? >> hi there jon. probably both. harry reid needs the president's help in vegas, ne
right. steve, thank you. >>> we now want to urn to the u.s./russian spy swap. the white house says it was actually in the works two weeks before the russian sleeper agents were arrested here. now, the former spies are starting their new lives. we have two reports from two continents this morning. we're going to begin with alex marquardt in moscow. good morning, alex. >> reporter: good morning, bianna. well, those ten spies from the united states, landed at moscow's main international airport late yesterday afternoon. they were quickly whisked off by authorities. and though this two-week saga is now over, the big question is what happens to them and their children? the arrival of the spies in moscow yesterday marked a new and uncertain chapter of their lives. the u.s. has seized their assets. and they will rely on russia and family to start their lives. anna chapman, perhaps the most famous of the ten, has said to want to move to london. a family member has said her family has left the moscow apartment and is hiding from reporters in the countryside. >> the difficult part for some o
afghan sources that the missing sailor was wounded in a firefight with taliban militants, the u.s. military is offering a $20,000 reward for information on the abduction. >>> and this year is shaping up to be the deadliest since the war in afghanistan began. 52 service members have died there this month. the high was 60 last month and we should also point out that the u.s. has more troops in afghanistan than ever before. the death toll for the year so far is 253. >>> it's 6:00 in the morning in south korea and there's a major show of force going on right now. the united states and south korea's military both engaged in war games. t the four-day drill has grabbed north korea's attention, which was actually the point. cnn's ken law has more from seoul. >> reporter: even through the overnight hours here in south korea the u.s. military says that the exercises are ongoing and will continue 24 hours a day until wednesday asia time. it is a large joint military operation between south korea and the united states. 8,000 military personnel, some 20 ships and submarines and 200 aircraft in
it keeps money flowing into the u.s. economy. why would they want to add to the debt when they still have lots of money that still hasn't been earmarked for anything? >> i can't answer that directly but i can say that speaker pelosi -- speaker pelosi, president obama and senator reid thinks spend more money, that's the best way to create jobs, spend more money, extend jobless benefits, they say that's a way of creating jobs. many economists say that's not correct. we're getting earnings reports from the financial companies, the economy, the recovery, has stalled, that you can say for sure. secondly, this extension of unemployment benefits will definitely add to the overall decifit. $34 billion. because we've got to borrow this money. if you look at the debt clock, that means that by the end of this day or by early tomorrow morning, top left, there you go, we've crossed $13.2 trillion. we'll be at 13.22 by the end of tomorrow or early into thursday morning. we're adding to the decifit. you can definitely say that. martha: i mentioned, we all remember not too long ago, they passed pay go wh
drama that started with the arrests nearly two weeks ago now has ended with a flight out of the u.s. and a spy swap straight out of the movies. pete williams is nbc's justice correspondent. well, pete, i'm sure you're sorry to see this story go. tell us how it went down in the final hours. >> still a bit up in the air quite rit rally because the ten russian spies on their way to russia. the plane left new york last night. landed in vienna this morning meeting the plane from russia carrying the four exchanged to the west. they were swapped on the tarmac and then both planes took off. the russian plane now on its way with the ten and some of their children, savannah. american authorities worked out with the russians that the couples that had children here in the u.s. could take their children with them. the children are, of course, american citizens born here and free to come back. the ten agreed as part of the plea eagreement to not enter th u.s. without permission. they gave the real names in their real russian names. admitted to a single charge that they were secret agents. they we
. lawmakers there are expected to make recommendations on milk prices later today. jenna: the u.s. census is providing a much-needed lifeline for hundreds of thousands of americans looking for work and now these temporary jobs are ending. unemployment remains stubbornly high despite the president's stimulus program. so there's a lot going on. steve centanni is live for us in washington. steve, tell us a little bit about what's different this year, about the census employment picture? >> reporter: well, jennifer, one thing are no hurry to leave their jobs with the census. in the past the census employees often gave early notice they were leaving so they could move on, take better jobs with better wages, but this year, there really aren't many jobs out there with the unemployment rate at 9.5%, so these employees are staying on the job as long as they can. but those jobs are rapidly disappearing. in fact, so many people left their census jobs in june, they were laid off, that the jobless numbers for both overall payroll employment and for government employment reflected that decline. the lab
. >>> this is a fox news alert. colton harris moore, the so-called barefoot bandit, a u.s. teenager who allegedly stole cars, boat and an airplane. he eludded law enforcement for two years and we're told he is arrested in the bahamas. we're waiting for a press conference to begin there and peter doocy has been following the story all weekend and will update us later in the show as we keep an eye on the press conference for more details. >>> palestinian president mahmoud abbas said there is no point in holding direct talk with israel when it comes to peace. he is refusing to return to the negotiating table until there is a freeze on settlement building in the west bank. for now they're negotiating through the u.s. envoy george mitchell who will meet with abbas later this week. the white house and netanyahu are urging direct peace talks between israelis and palestinians, some are asking is hitting the restart button viable in this particular ongoing conflict? democratic congressman brian baird travelled to gaza more than any other member of congress and joins to us share his insight. thank you for
journal this is "washington journal."> > . \. the u.s. recently opened itself to the most intense scrutiny yet by the international monetary fund, and on thursday was offered a bitter pill when the agency criticized some well-defended aspects of american culture. cheap fuel, sub deciding housing and a government retirement check. >> we want to get your reaction to the imf calling for the u.s. to make lifestyle changes. call the numbers on the screen. you can also tweet us at twitter.com/cspanwj or send an email to journal@c-span.org here are the numbers again to call in. this is back to the "washington post" article on the imf report calling for the u.s. lifestyle changes. the risks are tilted to the downside david robinson of the western hemisphere said as he presented the annual assessment of the u.s. economy in its first-ever review of the financial sector. host: now we got the imf report that just came out yesterday, and here's what it said -- in part of this report, and this is at imf.org if you want to read it for yourself. the obama administration's intention to freeze non-security
>> president obama will be at the white house today. he will pend time with u.s. troops and their families. vice president joe biden's second day of the trip to iraq. one headline says this is seen as a move to end the political deadlock there. also, today general david patraeus officially took command of the mission in afghanistan. a quote from him in this important endeavor teamwork is not an option. this is a tough mission. there is nothing easy about it said the general. on this independence day we have the question for you to open the program. is america exceptional? we have that from one writer from the new yo"new york daily who says it is time to rescue the idea that america is exceptional. what do you think? [phone numbers on the line] host: we have this piece on this fourth of july titled "bring back the old glory." he says the notion of american exceptionalism that it is a unique nation on earth if not in all history is in decline among much of the country's self-appointed chattering classes. they write the lion's share of books, magazines, editorials and blogs
with a surprise trip on to iraq and there he met with u.s. troops and also took the opportunity to push iraqi leaders to end an election inpass. but in the show of the kind of instability still raging in that country, bombings stole some of the focus. for more on that, we want to say good morning to tracie potts. she's in washington. >> reporter: we actually saw two mortar rounds hit inside the green zone while he was there. no major damage or no one hurt we're told. as a result of that. but as you mentioned, vice president biden was there for a couple of reasons. he ralliey rallied the troops ao met with iraqi leaders trying to break the political stalement that's been going on since their elections on march 7th hoping that they will -- encouraging them to form a coalition government. he said that the u.s. will support democracy, but that our nation nor should any other nation interfere with the process. >> now there's a new parliament has been seated and when the new government is formed, it will mark something absolutely extraordinary. a peaceful transition of power encompassing all the pe
rpassed vietnam as the longest military campaign in u.s. history. republican richard lugar demands more clarity about the administration's direction. also tributes were being paid to three british soldiers who also lost their lives in violent attacks, kill the by a rogue afghan soldier who has since gone on the run. >> they've got to reassure us they're doing everything they can to minimize it happening again. but for those who it has happened to in that patrol base, this will have been a horrific event. >> as the british casualties also continue to climb, it is becoming increasingly difficult to defend the british presence in afghanistan. also, this morning afghan president hamid karzai endorsed a u.s. plan to set up local police forces to help afghan villagers protect themselves. >> thanks to sonia gallego in london. >>> officers from north korea and the american-led united nations force that helps protect south korea came face to face this morning. on the agenda was the sinking of that south korean navy ship back in march. 46 south korean sailors were killed in that incident. th
, will be able to form a government. you know, the context of this, lynn, of course, is that u.s. forces are drawing down and that they continue on schedule. there will be no combat forces left there by the end of the next month. it's a little ironic that vice president biden was there promoting this unity government. it was senator biden before the 2008 election who first put forward the idea of partial or sort of quasi partition of iraq among the kurds, shiites and sunnis and now the fourth visit as vice president to iraq trying to encourage these leaders, prime minister, others, president to get it to get it together and form the government. when he was there, of course, he met with u.s. troops at a mess hall there. a dining hall. he was there, also, to attend a naturalization ceremony. there you see it there with general odierno. they wear the uniform and now -- shaking hands at that moment becoming u.s. citizens on the fourth of july. there was that scare. we should mention, lynn, when there were explosions. some sort of projectile hitting the ground within the green zone. the very
. ♪ >> reporter: for some u.s. soldiers working the front lines in iraq, this was a special fourth of july. a citizenship ceremony for foreign-born soldiers presided over by vice president joe biden. here at home, a day of parades like this one in historic philadelphia. a fife and drum corps at the national archives. and what would july fourth be without baseball? or the annual hot dog eating contest at nathan's in coney island. the winner, joey chestnut, 54 dogs and buns in 10 minutes. along the gulf coast, a more subdued holiday weekend. the beach crowds were absent. an uninvited guest, the biggest oil spill in u.s. history, spoiled the party. but for most of the country, the holiday spirit endured. larry jacobs, abc news. >>> cooling centers will be open in many parts of new york city today as forecasters predict a dangerous heat wave in the northeast. >> it could be the worst heat wave in 20 years. meteorologist ava dinges has the latest from accuweather. good morning, eva. >> good morning, jeremy and vinita. it was a sizzling fourth of july for many in the fourth east. in fact, centra
become u.s. citizens on a military base that used to be saddam hussein's hunting lodge. >> against all enemies, foreign and dhesic. >> we're in the middle of this marble palace, making a lie of everything he stood for. i find it delicious that that's happening. >> reporter: joe biden is here at a critical time. the u.s. forces drawing down, but becoming more diverse. iraq is much safer, hundreds of soldiers were able to go on a run, but in ramadi, a female suicide bomber attacks. another in mosul. while the vice president and his wife spent time with the troops. >> having worried so much about your son, how does it feel to be here yourself for the first time in iraq? >> well, i'm glad he's actually not here. i think it would more difficult. i just feel for all the families. i know what it's like and how much worry it is. >> part of the problem for most of the military back home is that it's only 1% of the country fighting this war. 99% appreciates what they do, but they don't know. they don't know. this brings awareness to the fact these guys are making one hell of a sacrifice. >> repo
comes amid the worst oil spill in u.s. history. >> compared to last year the gas prices here are 12 cents higher, that's consistent with the national average. >> the good news is that the prices are not near the mark like they were back in 2008. and in our state 658,000 people are expected to travel. 92% will be driving. law enforcement officials are out in force. and they will ride the routes and state police droppers are targeting reckless and impaired drivers. >> it will affect driver's judgment, their reaction time, motor skills and memory. it is a national issue. >> reporter: the policy director joined maryland law enforcement launching a new campaign raising awareness of drugged driving. >> we're focusing making hundreds of arrests for this violation pgh . >> reporter: for those avoiding the roads, air travel will bounce back with a 9% increase. regardless of how you get to your destination... >> be focused. avoid distractions. >> if you are in baltimore city 50 tax service is available for those in bars and restaurants. it does not include private parties. write the number
has more on the sputtering economic picture. >> reporter: the fact that u.s. businesses added only 83,000 jobs in june is a sign experts say the economy isn't recovering nearly fast enough. this comes after plummeting home sales in may, down 30%. auto sales are down 4.7%. factory orders fell 1.4%. the first drop after nine months of improvement. still, washington is at odds over how best to tackle the nation's financial woes. president obama believes more stimulus is needed to keep the sluggish economic recovery going. today he scolded republicans for failing to extend unemployment benefits before the fourth of july recess. >> republican leaders in washington just don't get it. >> reporter: but government stimulus increases the deficit, and republicans wanted to see how the benefits would be paid for before they passed them. >> we can't support job-killing taxes and adding tens of billions to the already unsustainable national debt. >> reporter: some economist argue spending is the only way to fully emerge from the recession. >> most people i know work for money, so you have to put th
was misunderstood. >>> and in afghanistan this morning, u.s. forces are fighting under a new commander. general david petraeus said on the fourth of july that the u.s. and its allies are, quote, engaged in a contest of wills and he intends to win it. joel brown has more. >> reporter: the 130,000 troops in afghanistan have a new leader. >> we are in this to win. that is our clear objective. >> reporter: general david petraeus, form soon to command forces in kabul, taking oef from general stanley mcchrystal, fired last week after the general and his aides were quoted mocking the obama administration. >> we have arrived at a critical moment. >> reporter: petraeus says despite the change in command, the mission in afghanistan remains the same. >> we must help afghan leaders develop their security forces and governing capacity so they can over time take on the tasks of securing their country and see to the needs of their people. >> reporter: petraeus takes over as u.s. casualties are on the rise and support for the nine-year-old war shrinks back home. the general who led the surge in iraq will try t
the west. >>> and american soil. the barefoot bandit arrives in the u.s. overnight. we'll talk with the lawyer who met with him face-to-face. >>> and baseball says good-bye to the boss, yankees owner, george steinbrenner. for one night, at least, there is crying in baseball. >>> good morning, everyone. and it was a touching tribute last night at the all-star game for, make no doubt about it, he was the boss. >> sure was. and derek jeter said, he wasn't only the boss. george steinbrenner was a friend, as well. >> he mellowed in his latter years, which was nice to see. >>> day 86 of the oil spill. the new cap was put in place over the well that's been leaking since april. but overnight, a snag. admiral thad allen announced a delay in beginning crucial tests to determine if this cap will withstand the pressure and finally stop the oil pouring into the gulf. you're there on the launch pad. five, four, three. >> but officials are optimistic. it's a big day. we've been dealing with so much down in the gulf for so long. five years after hurricane katrina, the fallout continues now. th
-737-0001. for independents, 202-628-0205. if you are calling from outside of the u.s., 202-628-0184. today would be the data use the internet if you have called within the last 30 days. that address, journal@c- span.org. you can also send us a message through twitter.com/c-spanwj. we will keep up-to-date with those throughout the program. this is the story we are referring to on the front page of "the new york times," business section. "government that business spending is a contentious issue right now in washington. the funds in the stimulus package for extending high-speed internet access is just beginning to be spent and the beneficiaries could not be happier. the types of internet activities that most americans take for granted are out of the reach of millions of homes across the united states. these people either have outmoded, dial-up internet service or have no affordable internet service. sometimes the nearest high speed internet connection is that all local library, 10 miles away. the program is a guest -- intended to extend the broadband service to what is known as the middle mile, which can conne
.m., an author will discuss the u.s. foreign policy. that is next here on c-span. . . the spots that the groups are releasing today and talk with you about your thoughts on public campaign financing. that is really what they are arguing. the loss has 157 co-sponsors they are proposing. -- the law has 157 co-sponsors they are proposing. there is a tally of how the cost of a lectionary in the united states has changed of the past decade. what i have highlighted on this page are presidential election cycles. let's look at the ones not highlighted. back in 1998, total spent was $1.6 billion. in 2006 $2.8 billion. if you use a widget, there is a tally of the cost of the 2010 election so far and it keeps changing. you can see that on the bottom left of the screen. it is in the neighborhood of $2.4 billion so far, the cost of a campaign 2010. let's show you this advertisement that they are releasing today in washington, d.c., to argue for public financing of campaigns. >> pp destroys the gulf, we pay the price. -- bp destroys the gulf, we pay the price. congress is putting special interest first. why?
. the largest u.s.-russia spy swap since the cold war is a done deal today it. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff, on the newshour tonight, the hand over of ten spy as rested here for four convicted in russia took place in vienna in less than 90 minutes time. we get the latest on how this spy story played out. >> lehrer: then margaret warner assesses the economic state of the states. with governors ed rendell of pennsylvania. >> woodruff: fred de sam laz ro reports on one man's mission to help the unemployed find work. >> i think about the training and you get papers and if you get papers you can get jobs easily. >> lehrer: mark shields and david brooks offer their weekly analysis. >> woodruff: and we look at the hype and the fallout from basketball star lebron james's decision to leave the cleveland cavaliers . >> it is very tough and i'm going to take pie talent to the beech and join the miami heat. >> lehrer: ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was
afternoon here in the cnn news room. i'm don lemon, in for veali velshi. >>> from u.s. to norway to the uk, to pakistan, as summer heat up, so do the terror plots. new arrests in a never-ending investigation, a widening investigation. >>> another stunner from the guy next door file -- first it was accused russian spies now it's an alleged serial killer. imagine the murderer dubbed the grim sleeper, living next door to you. >>> and how do you feel about a blind person behind the wheel of a car? a plan is in the works to teach the blind to drive and to break down another barrier. >>> we're going to start with this. we'll start with the terror suspects that have been arrested, some charged, some still not in custody. the ones arrested norway. the feds charge an alleged al qaeda operative with helping to mastermind the new york subway plot. and another terror suspect is arrested in britain, all examples of what authorities say is al qaeda's global reach. and continued determination to kill americans and their allies. here's what we know now. three suspects were arrested today, two in norway, o
is on hold. now allegations of u.s. war crimes from the man who first published the documents online. t.j. winick has the latest now from washington. good morning, t.j. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. the documents come to light at a time when the public and congress have some serious doubts about the war. it is being called one of the biggest intelligence breaches in u.s. history. 92,000 leaked reports, six years of classified records, depicting details about missions gone horribly wrong, civilian deaths, and being double-crossed by our alleged ally the pakistani government. >> it poses a very real and potential threat to those that are working hard every day to keep us safe. >> reporter: the u.s. gives more than $1 billion annually to pakistan to help fight terrorism. but there are 180 dispatches, some offering strong detail that pakistan's military intelligence agency, the isi, is helping the afghan insurgency attack american troops. >> i'm looking forward to my meeting with the defense minister. we have a lot to talk about. >> reporter: secretary of state clinton dodged a
the most controversial provisions in lot. u.s. district judge susan bolton issued a law that stops some of it from going into effect. that police stop or detain or arrest if there's a reasonable suspicion they're in the country illegally, a provision requiring immigrants to carry their papers at all times. and another that would make it a crime for undocumented workers to seek work in public places. in a statement, the justice department had said the court ruled correctly that a patchwork of state and local policies would seriously disrupt immigration enforcement and would ultimately be counterproductive. but arizona's governor jan brewer had a different perspective. >> i think it's important to remind everybody that today, absolutely, the federal government got relief from the courts to do their job. and that means now they've got this temporary injunction, they need step up, the feds do, and do the job that they have the responsibility to do for the people of america. and for the people of arizona. >> the specifics of the state's appeal of the ruling have not been announced but legal
.p. is collecting a lot less of it than it predicted it could. it's day 78. u.s. v. arizona. the obama administration files suit to try to stop the state's new immigration law. and the city named for the duke of york says welcome back to the queen of england. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. the sun rose in the east and it showed no mercy. on day two of the heat wave, the national weather service had advisories up from virginia to as far north as maine. that's tens of millions of people keeping cool any way they could. and demand for electricity put a real strain on the power system. the combination of heat and humidity made it feel like the temperature was in triple digits and in some places it actually was. in fact, in baltimore, the mercury reached a record 105 degrees. our national correspondent jeff glor is here in new york and, jeff, we set a record here as well. >> reporter: we did, indeed, katie. 103 degrees in new york city. hasn't been that hot here si
in washington for us. thanks, john. >>> the u.s. has slapped iran with a new set of unilateral sanctions. obama signed them lat night at the wall street. and for banks that provide services to iran's government. like the recent u.n. sanctions, these are meant to force iran into giving up its nuclear program. >>> general david petraeus takes up his command in afghanistan today. on the way to kabul, he stopped at nato headquarters in brussels. petraeus assured america's partners that the war strategy has not changed, despite the change in leadership. he arrives in afghanistan, during the season of heaviest fighting. june was the deadliest month for american troops in the nine-year war. >>> two deadly blasts at a muslim site in pakistan. security cameras caught the home when the bombs exploded last night in lahore. close to 40 people were killed in the blast. some blame a group connected to the taliban to be responsible. >>> closer to home, more extreme border violence. just miles from a busy border crossing in arizona, 21 people were killed last night in a gun battle between drug traffickers. mex
that a good 75% of productivity change in the u.s. economy, which is a source of increase of real wages and income, is due to the education and training of our workforce. we also have to have real and lasting limits on what we can spend. that means we are going to have to have some changes in how we provide and pay for higher education. this is difficult, because everybody has become comfortable in what we have been doing for far too long. higher education is one of the areas where states have a lot of responsibility and work governors must play a leadership role. when i thought about my initiative, i thought about as a governor, what and how we have the most input in education? primary and secondary education as a lot of parks constituents believe we have total control. we have a very little control. in higher education, we do have. we a. most of our governing boards. we have a tremendous impact on the funding that goes into our colleges. so i felt that was an area where we as governors could play our role. this is why my initiative is called "complete to compete." it will focus on imp
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